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Documentary (Feature)

American Factory
The Cave
The Edge of Democracy
For Sama
Honeyland

Winner: American Factory

While there was support for way the clothes in Joker heightened the psychological turmoil of the central character, the Oscar for best costume design goes to the striking period costumes in Little Women. Brit Jacqueline Durran has previously won an Oscar for Anna Karenina and been nominated for Pride & Prejudice, Atonement, Mr Turner, Darkest Hour and Beauty and the Beast. She was also costume designer for 1917.

Jacqueline Durran accepts the award for best costume design for Little Women.

Jacqueline Durran accepts the award for best costume design for Little Women.Credit:AP

Look, Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood is a great looking film. But I am stunned that it has pipped 1917. Of all the awards Sam Mendes’ film should have been a lock for, this is the one. The incredible production design is a key element in even making its faux one-shot conceit possible. Does this, coupled with the original screenplay award for Parasite, suggest the love for 1917 is starting to cool?

Hollywood loves a film about Hollywood, especially one as steeped in nostalgia as Once Upon A Time … In Hollywood. Barbara Ling has won an Oscar with her first nomination; Nancy Haigh has won previously for Bugsy and has seven other nominations including Barton Fink, Forrest Gump and True Grit.

Costume Design

Sandy Powell and Christopher Peterson, The Irishman
Mayes C. Rubeo, Jojo Rabbit
Mark Bridges, Joker
Jacqueline Durran, Little Women
Arianne Phillips, Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood

Winner: Jacqueline Durran, Little Women

Maya Rudolph and Kristen Wiig are upset. They turn their backs, make as if they’re going to walk offstage, then immediately turn back.

“Guys, we’re not mad,” says Wiig. “That’s acting,” says Rudolph. “There are a lot of directors in this room.”

They choke up as they announce the award they’re presenting is for production design. “That’s something else we’re passionate about,” says Wiig. It’s not their best bit, but kinda fun all the same.

Maya Rudolph, left, and Kristen Wiig present the award for best production design.

Maya Rudolph, left, and Kristen Wiig present the award for best production design.Credit:AP

Production Design

Bob Shaw and Regina Graves, The Irishman
Ra Vincent and Nora Sopkova, Jojo Rabbit
Dennis Gassner and Lee Sandales, 1917
Barbara Ling and Nancy Haigh, Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood
Lee Ha Jun and Cho Won Woo, Parasite

Winner: Barbara Ling and Nancy Haigh, Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood

Speaking backstage, best supporting actor winner Brad Pitt dispelled rumours he had hired a writer for his awards season speeches, but acknowledged he had put a lot of effort into writing them.

“I have always been really tentative about speeches, they make me really nervous,” Pitt said. “I know this sounds antithetical given the profession I have chosen but [being on stage] is not my thing.”

Asked by an American reporter whether he was “having the time of your life?” Pitt seemed startled at first but then responded quite honestly. “Uh … no, I hope not,” he said. “I hope I got other shit going on. But it has been a special run. It’s a community I love and friends I have made over 30 years. And I feel a responsibility to that more than anything, more than a victory lap.” Asked by Australian reporter Angela Bishop if he would be changing the text on his Tinder profile in the wake of the win, he replied coyly: “You’ll just have to look it up.”

Way back in 2005, New Zealand’s Taika Waititi had an Oscar nomination for his second short film, Two Cars One Night. Waititi originally wrote Jojo Rabbit as a more serious film, then added the character of Adolf Hitler as Jojo’s imaginary friend. The film’s backer, Fox Searchlight, only wanted to make the movie if Waititi agreed to play Hitler because he understood how to play the character comically.

It’s an odd thing that the films vying for best adapted screenplay are some of the most original works of the year. And none more so than winner Jojo Rabbit.

“Thank you. Amazing,” says Taika Waititi as he takes the stage.

He thanks his mother for giving him the book he adapted, and to the book’s author, Christine Leunens. He dedicates the win “to all the indigenous kids around the world who want to make art”.

Timothee Chalamet, left, presents the award for best adapted screenplay to Taika Waititi for Jojo Rabbit.

Timothee Chalamet, left, presents the award for best adapted screenplay to Taika Waititi for Jojo Rabbit.Credit:AP